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English Phrasal Verbs

Practice your English with Caroline Brown

 

These exercises are about using the verb 'to blow ' combined with particles:

'to blow about' means that the wind moves something in different directions.

  • After the concert, there was a lot of litter blowing about in the park.
  • We tried to collect up all the rubbish and plastic bags that were blowing about in the wind.

'to blow away' means that the wind blows something from the place it was in to another.

  • We fixed the tent securely so that it wouldn't be blown away in the strong wind.
  • The wind blew all the labels away so I didn’t know what I had planted in the garden.

'to blow back' means that the wind blows something in the direction it came from.

  • When I turned the corner, the wind was so strong I just got blown back.
  • The wind blew the smoke back down the chimney into the room.

'to blow down' means that the wind makes something fall to the ground.

  • A tree was blocking the road. It had been blown down in the storm.
  • The hurricane had blown down the traffic signals and electricity cables all over town.

'to blow off' means that the winds removes something from a position on something.

  • I was trying to pick up my hat that had been blown off in the wind.
  • The wind was so strong, I got blown off my bicycle.

'to blow out' means to extinguish a fire or flame.

  • I couldn't light the campfire. The wind kept blowing it out.
  • Happy Birthday! Blow out the candles on your cake.

'to blow over' means that an argument or some trouble has come to an end.

  • I thought that the argument would quickly blow over but it didn't.
  • All that has blown over now. We've forgotten about it.

'to blow up' means to destroy something by an explosion.

  • The vehicle was blown up when it drove over a landmine.
  • They were carrying homemade bombs to blow up the plane mid-flight.

'to blow up' also means to lose your temper, to become very angry.

  • He was furious. He just blew up and started shouting at everyone.
  • My parents blew up when they found me smoking. They were so angry.

'to blow up' also means to put air into something.

  • That tire looks flat. I must go blow it up.
  • I spent the afternoon blowing up balloons for the party.

exercise1

exercise 2

exercise 3

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